Itô Miyu 伊藤光雪 (*2002), Fukushima-City: "Please see Fukushima with your own eyes" (福島をあなたの目で見てください)

About my experience of the Great East Japan Earthquake                 私の東日本大震災の経験について

 

 

At the time of the 2011 Tôhoku earthquake, I was staying at my friend's house.  It was the last day of the third semester. I had finished the third grade at that day.

 

As I was watching TV with my friend and my sister, the ground began to shake. My friend and my sister ran under the table quickly. I took friend’s brother’s hand and hid under the table, too. I could see the situation from a gap in the table. My mother opened the window. Her fishbowl fell. The bowl and the fish inside bounced around on the floor. The ground was shaking for a long time. Everyone’s face looked so scared. I couldn't understand what was happening to me. It felt like something out of a story. I couldn't believe it was real, and this made me tremble.

 

My house was in ruins. The wall had many cracks. Picture frames and decorations were scattered. Everything had fallen over. My favorite books, the picture I took with my family, my note books and textbooks. Everything was broken. A lot of fish died on my books. Little fish, big fish, all of them died. I thought to myself is this actually my house? Is this my room? Did we live here? I couldn’t believe it. And I couldn't understand the situation yet.

 

For a while, my family and I had to stay in my grandmother’s house. My grandmother’s house still had electricity and water, so we could see what was on TV. The phone rang many times. We hid under the table every time there were aftershocks. On the news program, the newscaster was talking with a tense face. They were playing videos of what happened, and that was the first time I saw a video of the tsunami. Many houses, towns, and harbors were swallowed by the tsunami. Everything was destroyed. Everything disappeared. Memories and lives were stolen. In the videos, people were crying and shouting. ”Please return my hometown to me!”, “my house is being washed away!”,  “Where is my son!”, “Hurry up! We must escape to a high place!”. The newscaster told us how many people died during this disaster. And that’s when I understood the situation. A lot of people died and the town was destroyed. A terrible thing had happened.

 

I felt a deep fear inside my heart. I cried. I thought “I don’t want to die. I want to live”. I faced death at only nine years old.

I didn't know a lot about radiation, but I thought it was like a dangerous poison. I thought that even if I put just a little bit in my body, it would kill me. We couldn't drink water because it was polluted by radiation.

 

After a long time, I returned to my house. I cleaned my room. I buried dead fish in the ground. The books that got wet from the fish are still being stored today. I can't say when the great east Japan earthquake exactly finished. I actually don’t think it’s over even now. Many people still can't live in their hometown, and agriculture is still suffering from its damaged reputation. We can't forget this happened. I still can't watch videos of the earthquake and tsunami without breaking down in tears.  This incident left a big wound in us. I’ll never forget it.  Neither will the other people who experienced this tragedy.  I think victims have a duty to tell many people about their experiences in order to protect peace in the future and not let the memory of this event fade. I believe this is our role. Please don't forget this happened. Please don't forget us. And please share this problem with many people. I think this is a powerful way to protect the lives of many people and help prevent further tragedy from future earthquakes.

 

Through these six years

 

The first day back at school after the event, my classmates and I had to make some promises.  First, we wouldn’t play in the schoolyard. Second, we would put masks on when going outside. Third, we would wear long-sleeved clothing outside. We kept those promises for a while, but after just one year passed, they were forgotten. Our lives were almost back to normal.

 

One day for a field trip, I visited a harbour in Fukushima. I was shocked as I emerged from the bus. There were almost no houses or buildings. The high ground was neat and flat, but there were still only a few houses there. It seemed like nobody had moved back into their homes here. Certainly, it would be difficult for people to return, especially for young people who are afraid of the radiation.

 

 

When I visited temporary housing where victims lived, I heard stories from the people living there. One woman said, ”My house and town washed away. My family has fallen apart because of radiation. Many volunteers helped me. Everybody liked to sing the song for our hometown. The song says: “Fish filled the rivers and rabbits ran wild, I carry these memories wherever I may roam.” But I couldn't sing that song. Because these memories disappeared in an instant. Rivers, people, my hometown. I lost everything in a flash. The first three years were hard for me. I couldn't talk to anyone. I was just sad. But now, I think I must tell my experience to many people. And I am very grateful for all the people who helped me.”

 

I felt tears come to my eyes as she shared her story. That must have been so difficult for her. But now she is looking toward the future. I thought I must do the same.

 

Radiation took a huge toll on us. More cases of thyroid cancer in children and young people had been found recently, and many people still can't return to their hometown. Sometime People call us “Dirty”. When people hear the name “Fukushima” they make a sour face. When I search Fukushima on the internet, I see “Fukushima is dirty. Fukushima is dangerous. Fukushima is terrible.” I want to ask the people who wrote these things “What do you know about Fukushima? Did you see Fukushima with your own eyes?” I can't say what is the truth, and I think everyone doesn't know the truth. Nobody can predict the future. Maybe more number of people or I could have thyroid cancer. Or maybe radiation couldn't decrease.

 

And in the future, maybe more tragedies could happen.

But please don't discriminate against us. Please don't call us “Dirty”. Because we are recovering.

 

Many people not only from Fukushima are trying their best to make better Fukushima. They are struggling against radiation. Please don't see only bad point of us.

 

Please see the truth of us. I want you to say one thing - please lend your hand for us. I believe we can make a great future of Fukushima. We can make it.

 

And young people must do it. So please visit Fukushima and see it with your own eyes. Please think with me what we can do to help. Let's make a better Fukushima together.    

 

その時、私は友達の家にいた。その日は三学期の最後の日だった。その日、小学三年生が終わったところだった。

 

地面が揺れ始めた時、私はテレビを友達と姉と見ていた。友達と姉はすぐに机の下へ逃げた。私も友達の弟の手を掴んで、机の下へ隠れた。机の隙間からあおの状態が見えた。母が窓を開けた。金魚鉢が落ちて、床に跳ねて、魚たちも床で跳ねた。地面はまだ揺れていた。長い時間地面が揺れた。みんな怖がっていた。しかし私は何が起こってるのか理解できなかった。まるで、なにか、物語の中にいるように思えた。それが現実だと信じられなかった。だから私は少しワクワクしていた。

 

 私の家もひどく壊れていた。壁に多くのひびが入っていた。写真たてと飾り物が散らばって壊れた。全てが落ちていた。私の好きな本、家族と一緒に撮った写真、ノートや教科書。全てが壊されていた。多くの魚が私の本の上で死んだ。小さな魚、大きな魚、みんな死んだ。ここは本当に私の家なのかここは私の部屋なのかここに私たちは住んでいたのか信じられなかった。そして私はまだ自分の状況を理解できていなかった。

 

私はしばらくの間、祖母の家に家族と住んだ。その家では電気と水が使えたから、私たちはテレビが見えた。なんども電話のベルがなって、余震が起こるたびに私たちは机の下に隠れた。私はニュース番組を見た。ニュースキャスターは緊迫した顔つきで話していた。震災の映像が流れた。そこで私は初めて津波の映像をみた。多くの家が、町が、港が津波に飲み込まれていた。全てが破壊されていた。思い出と生活が盗まれた。人々が泣き叫んでいた。私に故郷を返して家が流されてってる息子はどこなのまだ会えてないわ急げもっと高いところに行かなきゃやばいぞニュースキャスターは震災で何人亡くなったかいった。そして私はその瞬間自分の状況が理解できた。多くの人が死んで、町が壊されたんだ。大変なことが起こったんだ。

 

 私はその時、心の底から恐怖を感じた。私は泣いた。死にたくないと思った。生きたいと思った。私はたった9歳で、死の恐怖に直面した。

そして私は放射線についても何も知らなかった。しかし、私はそれは何か、危険な毒だと思っていた。もし少しでも体に入れたら、殺されると思った。そして水も放射線で飲めなくなった。

 

しばらくして、私は家に帰った。私は部屋を綺麗にした。そして、死んだ魚を土に埋めた。魚で濡れた本は今でも私の元にとってある。私はいつ東日本大震災が終わったのかわからない。けど、それはまだ終わっていないと思う。まだ故郷に帰れてない人々もいるし、未だに風評被害を受けるからだ。そして、私たちはこの出来事を忘れることができないからだ。私は六年たった今でも、震災や津波の映像を見ることができない。見ている間に涙が流れてくる。それほど震災は私たちに大きな傷を残した。私は絶対にこの出来事を忘れない。それは私だけじゃない。被害者全てがそうである。だからこそ被害者はその体験を伝えるべきだと思う。それが、平和を守ることや震災を風化させないことに繋がるからだ。それは私たちの役目だと私は思う。だからこの出来事を忘れないでほしい。私たちのことを忘れないでほしい。そして、この出来事を伝え広げてください。私はこのことこそが多くの人の命を守ること、震災へ抵抗する強力な手段だと思う。

 

この六年間を通して

 

 震災後初めて学校に行った時、そこではいくつかの約束事が話されました。校庭では遊ばないこと。外に出るときはマスクをすること。なるべく長袖を着用すること。私たちは震災後、しばらくはその約束を守りましたが、一年も経ってしまうと、その約束事は忘れ去られ、ほとんど元の生活に戻りました。

 

 学校の行事で、私は遠足で港町を訪れました。そこで私は大きなショックを受けました。ほとんど、家や建物がないのです。高い堤防の内側は、綺麗に平らに整備されていました。しかしあるのは、数軒の家だけです。人々は引っ越してしまって、住む人がいないという話を聞きました。きっと人々が帰ってくるのは難しいでしょう。特に若い人々は放射線を恐れて、戻ってこないのです。

 

私が借上住宅を訪れた時、私はそこに住んでいる方からお話を聞けました。彼女は言いました、「私の家は流されちゃったんだよ。放射線で家族はバラバラになったし……。たくさんの人がボランティアで助けてくれたね。でも、そこでふるさとを歌うんだけど、「うさぎおいしかのやま 小鮒釣りしかの川」なんて歌えなかった。だって一瞬にしてきえっちまったんだもん。一瞬にしてだよ。最初の三年は辛かったね。人に話せなかったもん。ずっと悲しかった。でも、三年もすぎちまうと、若い人に語りつがなきゃなって思うようになったんだ。本当に感謝してんだよ、ボランティアの方々にわね」

 

私は彼女の話を聞いているうちに涙が出てきました。どれだけ彼女は苦しかったでしょうか。しかし、彼女はまっすぐ未来を見ていました。私も前を見なきゃ、そう思えました。

 

 放射線は私たちに甚大な被害をもたらしました。子供たちの中甲状腺癌率がたかくなってしまいました。そして、多くの人々が彼らの故郷に帰れてません。そして人々は私たちを汚いと言います。福島と聞いただけで嫌な顔をします。福島についてインターネットで検索して見ると、そこには、「福島は汚い。福島は危険。福島はヤバい場所だ」そう書いてあります。けれど、私は福島をそう考える人に言いたいです。「福島の何を知っているのか。あなたの目で福島を見たのか。」と。私は何が真実か分かりません。でもそれは誰もわからないと私は思います。もっと多くの人がもしくは私自身が甲状腺癌になるかもしれません。放射線量が減らないかもしれません。

 

さらにひどいことが起こるかもしれません。でも、私たちを差別しないでください。私たちを汚いと言わないでください。私たちは復興しています。

 

福島の人たちだけではなく多くの人が福島のために全力を尽くしています。多くの人が放射線と戦っています。私たちの悪いところだけを見ないでください。

 

本当の私たちをみてください。私はみなさんにお願いしたいことがあります。私たちに手を貸してください。私は私たちが良い福島の未来を作れると思います。私たちなら作れます。

 

私若い人はそれをそれをすべきです。だから、あなた自身の目で福島を見て、福島に何ができるのか私たちと一緒に考えてください。私たちと一緒に福島をさらにいい場所にしましょう。    


Translation into English by Itô Miyu / Copyright: Itô Miyu